Organic Rules and Certification

All differences in one table by EU regulation

  • EC Council Regulation No. 2092/91
    • Annex I. Principles of organic production and processing
      • A.Plant and plant products
        • Conversion - Annex I A1
Go back to overview Go to complete documents for this section
Title Description Difference Justification and Comments
Contamination, preventing, contaminated areas - DE Bioland 2005
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
Areas that are contaminated with harmful substances from the environment or from previous use of the area cannot be used for the production of BIOLAND food products (Bioland article 3.2 Location and 7.10 Contamination tests).
The BIOLAND standard has an specific provision, which is not in the EU Regulation 2092/91, regarding the handling of contaminated areas, but there is just a general statement about the possibility for the authorities to prolonge the conversion period for certain areas taking into account the prior use. To guarantee the innocuousness of BIOLAND products.
Conversion period - CH Regulation/Ordinance 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
The conversion period lasts 2 years, starting on January 1st. The Swiss Ordinance foresees the start for conversion only for January 1st of each calendar year and the application for conversion must be deposited by August 31st of the previous year (hereafter, no application of disallowed substances is allowed anymore). From Januray 1st of the first year of conversion, Swiss farms are allowed to market their produce with the claim 'in conversion to organic farming'
The Swiss Ordinance accepts a shorter conversion period for perennial crops than the EU Regulation 2092/91, which applies a zero year which leads to a total of 36 months in perennials and 24 months in annual crops. For reasons of credibility in the consumers eyes, the Swiss Ordinance strictly defines the beginning of conversion starting with the first year of inspection on the spot.
Conversion period - DE Naturland 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
The conversion of a farm with all its farming units must be concluded at the latest five years after beginning the conversion period for the first of the units. (NL standards on production A.I.8.Approval)
The NATURLAND standard has additional requirements. There is no upward limit for the duration of the conversion period in the EU Regulation 2092/91. In order to make the whole farm conversion easier while considering the individual situation of a farm (i.e. economic viability, running contracts, crop rotation) it should not be necessary to convert the whole farm at once. However, as parallel production is not allowed, there must be a time limit in order to ensure the whole farm conversion and safeguard the integrity of the organic farm.
Conversion period - Int. IFOAM Standards 2005 IFOAM standards require in general a period of at least 36 months for conversion. Depending on the previous land use, the conversion period can be reduced to 12 months. EU Regulation 2092/91 states that the minimum conversion period must be between 2 and 3 years: Generally a period of at least two years before sowing is required, or in the case of grassland at least two years before being used as an organic feedstuff, or in the case of perennial crops (excluding grassland) at least three years before the first harvest. IFOAM states at least 12 months prior to the start of the production cycle and in the case of perennials (excluding pastures and meadows) a period of at least 18 months prior to harvest However, where certain conditions are met the EU can make the minimum time 12 months. So in this respect there is some equivalency between both sets of standards. No justification was given.
Conversion period, CH Bio Suisse Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
A conversion period of at least 2 full calendar years is required. No retrospective approval is granted (no reduction of the conversion period possible)
BIO SUISSE accepts a shorter conversion period for perennial crops than the EU Regulation 2092/91. EU applies a zero year which leads to a total of 36 months in perennials and 24 months in annual crops. BIO SUISSE however foresees the start for conversion only for January 1st of each calendar year and the application for conversion must be deposited by August 31st of the previous year (hereafter, no application of disallowed substances is allowed anymore). From Januray 1st of the first year of conversion, BIO SUISSE farms are allowed to market their produce under the claim 'in conversion' BIO SUISSE standards were in force before EU Regulation was created. BIO SUISSE does not allow a reduction of the conversion period in any cases.
Conversion period, land for livestock production - Int. IFOAM Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
IFOAM requires a conversion period of at least 12 months prior to pastures, meadows and products harvested therefrom being considered organic. Landless animal husbandry systems are prohibited. (5.1.)
IFOAM requires 12 months of conversion for pastures, whereas according to EU Regulation 2092/91 a reduction down to 6 months conversion period is possible for pastures and meadows. In the context that a converson period enables the establishment of an organic management system IFOAM requires the longer conversion period than EU for pastures.
Conversion period, plant production - NL Skal Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
SKAL has defined precisely the possibility to reduce the conversion period to only six months before cultivation starts. The owner of the land should officially approve that the soil is managed according to the EU Regulation on organic farming.
SKAL is only implementing the possibility of a derogation of the EU Regulation 2092/91, but does not make it more restrictive. The EU rule which is referred to is in Annex II, part B, 2.1.2: "By derogation from this principle, the conversion period may be reduced to one year for pastures, open air runs and exercise areas used by non-herbivore species. This period may be reduced to six months where the land concerned has not, in the recent past, received treatments with products other than those referred to in Annex II of this Regulation. This derogation must be authorised by the inspection authority or body." As the derogation must be authorised on national level, in this case by SKAL.
Conversion period, plant production - SI Rules 2003
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
In SI Rules, the conversion period can be shortened under the condition that the operator of the agricultural holding can provide a guarantee that the production (unit) has already been subject to organic inspection system for a minimum of 1 year before (SI Rules 2003 Art. 12).
In principle the conversion period in plant production is regulated in the same way as in EU 2092/91, however it provides less possibilities for shortening the conversion period. No other possibility for shortening the conversion period as mentioned in the EU 2092/91 is foreseen. This relates to the situation in 1999 when the first state-approved organic inspection body started to operate. The provision allowed those farms that have been already participating in private organic inspection and certification schemes before 1999 to shorten the conversion period.
Conversion period, start date - NL Skal Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
The conversion period starts at the date set by SKAL. This date will be the day that the contribution to SKAL is paid by the producer / farmer.
SKAL sets the start date by financial contribution to SKAL, whereas the EU Regulation 2092/91 says it has to be 2 years before sowing. See Rule Text: "Annex I, part a) 1.1: The principles laid down in Article 6(1)(a), (b) and (d) and set out in particular in this Annex must normally have been applied on the parcels during a conversion period of at least two years before sowing, or, in the case of grassland, at least two years before its exploitation as feeding stuff from organic farming, or, in the case of perennial crops other than grassland, at least three years before the first harvest of products as referred to in Article 1(1)(a)." A certain starting point has to be given.
Conversion, GMO crops - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005 A 5-year period is required from the harvest of any previous genetically modified crop before the land where it was grown may become fully organic. Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraph 3.6.17. Soil Association Standards contain a restriction not included in EU Regulation 2092/91. Soil Association standards require a 5-year period from the harvest of any previous genetically modified crop before the land where it was grown may become fully organic. EU Regulation has no similar requirement. Soil Association standards aim to minimise the risks of contaminating organic crops with genetically modified plant material by requiring an extended period for conversion of land after cultivation of genetically modified crops. Genetically modified organisms are prohibited from use in organic farming because of the unpredictable nature of the technology, and the risks to health and the environment.
Conversion, application of biodynamic preparations - Demeter International 2005
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
Manures and composts must be treated with the biodynamic preparations. A prerequisite for the certification of the farm as "In Conversion to demeter" (Biodyn) after 12 months of farming to these standards is at least one application of the spraying preparations (cow-horn manure and the horn silica), and the spreading of prepared manures on all areas of the enterprise. (DI production standards, 4. Biodynamic Preparations)
The DI standard has additional requirements than the EU Regulation 2092/91. There is no requirement about the preparation or application of the biodynamic preparations in the EU Regulation. It is stated however, that these preparations can be used for the activation of compost. The use of the biodynamic preparations in the manure and compost is an indispensable aspect of the biodynamic method.
Conversion, crop rotation - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005 Fields starting organic conversion, which have grown a nutrient exploiting crop in the previous two years, such as cereals in the previous 2 years, must start the conversion with a fertility building phase of the crop rotation. (Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraph 4.2.5.) Soil Association standards are more detailed and have additional requirments than EU Regulation 2092/91. Soil Association Standards require that fields entering organic conversion, which have grown nutrient exploiting crops must start the first rotation of their organic conversion with a fertility building phase. EU Regulation does not contain this requirement, but only a requirement for a multi-annual rotation, including legumes green manures or deep-rooting plants, as the primary means to maintain or increase fertility. This Soil Association requirement enforces best agro-ecological practice at the start of organic conversion. It reduces any possibility that a producer might try to produce a nutrient exploiting crop by applying nutrient inputs to land with low nutrient levels entering conversion. Thus, this rule functions both as a guide for the producer and as a safeguard against poor practice in in-conversion crop production.
Conversion, general requirements - US NOP 2002 § 205.202 Land requirements. Any field or farm parcel from which harvested crops are intended to be sold, labelled, or represented as "organic," must: (a) Have been managed in accordance with the provisions of §§ 205.203 through 205.206 (b) Have had no prohibited substances, as listed in § 205.105, applied to it for a period of 3 years immediately preceding harvest of the crop (c) Have distinct, defined boundaries and buffer zones such as runoff diversions to prevent the unintended application of a prohibited substance to the crop or contact with a prohibited substance applied to adjoining land that is not under organic management. US requires 3 years with no prohibited materials prior to harvest, but does not require full implementation of organic practices during the entire conversion period. EU Regulation 2092/91 requires 2 years of organic management prior to sowing or 3 years before the first harvest in case of perennials. The EU requires inspection during the conversion period, whereas the US does not. The EU defines the beginning of the conversion period, for the US this is not relevant subsequently; there is no retroactive approval for the conversion period in the US. The Act does not require that land be under active organic management during the period prior certification and USDA do not believe such a requirement in these regulations is necessary. Such a requirement, for example, would necessitate some process for verifying that an operation is under active organic management, which would, in effect, require a certification-type decision a year before certification is granted and the operation can begin to label products as certified organic.
Conversion, grassland and labelling - DE Naturland Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
Grassland harvest can only be marketed with reference to NATURLAND, if it has been managed according the standards at least since 24 months before the beginning of the growing period. (NL standards on production Part A.I.9. Labelling and marketing).
The NATURLAND standard is more precise. The EU Regulation 2092/91 requires 24 months of full organic management before the harvest of organic grassland, without considering the growing period. The standard-setting body could not give a justification. A former version of the EU Regulation (2002) was determining for this provision. The NATURLAND provisions are being adapted to such changes in the EU Regulation.
Conversion, inspection and monitoring - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005 The organic conversion period may be reduced by up to 4 months, with Soil Association permission, only if the producer provides full records to prove that prohibited inputs were not previously used on the land for at least the period of the reduction. Conversion may be further reduced by up to 12 months with Defra permission, only if the same full records are provided and even then only if the land was in a recognised agri-environment scheme that prohibited all of the same inputs for at least the period of the reduction. Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraphs 4.3.7 and 4.3.8. Soil Association standards specify minimum periods as EU Regulation 2092/91 allows inspection bodies to do. Land must have been monitored by the Soil Association for at least 12 months before the crops may be sold as fully organic. EU Regulation does not include any minimum period for inspection body monitoring of land in conversion. EU Regulation allows the inspection body or authority to reduce the period of organic conversion if the land has been in an officially recognised agri-environment scheme that prohibits all the same inputs as those prohibited by organic standards or if the producer can prove to the inspection body that prohibited inputs have not been used for the period of reduction. Soil Association standards specify a limited reduction period of 4 months if the producer provides proof or 12 months if the land has been in an agri-environment scheme. The specified minimum period for inspection body monitoring of land in conversion is intended to avoid any consumer health problems that might result from the presence of prohibited input residues in organic products, and to ensure that farm system and environmental benefits of organic management will be effective when the land becomes fully organic.
Conversion, livestock and animal products - DE Bioland 2005
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
Animals of conventional origin have to be kept in compliance with these standards during the respective conversion period, before animal products can be sold with reference to BIOLAND / organic farming. For the different types of animals specific minimum periods apply in addition to at least 12 months of conversion of the respective land area for feed production. An alternative is the combined conversion of feed production area and livestock, which will last at least 24 months. Cattle, that has been born on conventional farms and reared with feeding stuffs, that are not permitted, can never be sold using the BIOLAND trademark. (Bioland production standards, 9.2.4 Use of Trade Mark for Animal Products, 9.2.4.1 Product related Conversion; Bioland production standards, 9.2.4 Use of Trade Mark for Animal Products, 9.2.4.2 Simultaneous Conversion of the Total Business)
The BIOLAND provisions contain further requirements in the case of single type conversion, because they require the animal specific conversion period in addition to the first year of conversion for the feed production area. According to the EU Regulation 2092/91 the minimum conversion periods for the animals (which are the same in both regulations) can apply regardless of the conversion of the land, if the animals can be fed according to the regulation from the beginning of the conversion period. The use of the BIOLAND trademark is not regulated. In order to be able to feed the animals with at least 50% of home grown feed which is no longer conventional feed.
Conversion, microbial levels - NL SKAL Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
When, in special occasions, the microbiological activity is at a very low level, caused by mechanical non-penetrable covering, organic farming can only start 6 months after appropriate management of the soil.
SKAL defines a norm for the time needed for microbiological activity to recover after covering, whereas the EU Regulation 2092/91 has not defined such a period. See EU rule text: "Annex I, part a) 1.2: However, the inspection authority or body may decide, in agreement with the competent authority, to recognise this retroactively as being part of the conversion period" Microbial activity is necessary for good organic farming systems.
Conversion, polluted soil - NL SKAL Standard 2005
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
When the soil is chemically polluted, Skal will extend the period of conversion for as long as necessary to have no residues in the products.
Skal is more precise then the EU Regulation 2092/91 by defining when and how they will extend the period of conversion in cases of polluted soil. The EU rule Text ("Annex I, part a) 1.3) only mentions that the "the inspection authority or body may, with the approval of the competent authority, decide, in certain cases, to extend the conversion period beyond the period laid down in paragraph 1.1 having regard to previous parcel use." The risk of remaining residues in the soil from former use is seen as a justification to extend the conversion period.
Conversion, preconditions - DE Naturland Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
If land area is likely to be contaminated with harmful substances, soil analyses must be realised prior to conversion to determine the actual contamination. Additional demands can be made with regard the conversion of contaminated area. (NL standards on production: Part A.I. Conditions to be fulfilled prior to the conclusion of a producer contract. Part B.III.Market gardening, 1.2-1.3.)
The NATURLAND standard is more precise by requiring soil testing where contamination can be expected (i.e. in intensively farmed greenhouses). In the EU Regulation 2092/91 there is just the general information that authorities can prolong the conversion period taking into account the former use of an area. This is to avoid the contamination of the organic crop with substances that have been applied before the beginning of the organic management.
Conversion, retroactive approval - CH Bio Suisse Standards 2005:
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
A conversion period of at least 2 full calendar years is required. No retrospective approval is granted (no reduction of the conversion period possible).
Whereas BIO SUISSE requires a two years conversion period beginning in the first year of inspection by an official inspection body, EU Regulation 2092/91 offers the possibility for retrospective approval in cases, where previous management methods are proved to be in compliance with the Regulation (approval as 'organic' after 6 months of first inspection for pastures or immediate approval for other plots if last conventional practice happened more than 3 years ago). The inflexibility in the conversion period is thought to increase consumer credibility. The Bio Suisse standards in this case comply with the Swiss government regulation.
Conversion, retroactive approval - CH Demeter Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
A conversion period of 4 full calendar years is required; crops may be sold with 'DEMETER' denomination in the fourth year of conformity with DEMETER standards. No retrospective approval is granted (no reduction of the conversion period possible). In case of a certified production according Bio Suisse Standards, DEMETER approval may occur in the second year of conformity with DEMETER Standards.
Whereas DEMETER requires a 36 months conversion period beginning with the first year of inspection by an official inspection body, EU Regulation 2092/91 offers the possibility for retrospective approval in cases where previous management methods are proven to be in compliance with the regulation. Essential agricultural knowledge and skills in the biodynamic method are important prerequisitites for successfull farming. To acquire this knowledge and to gain credibility for the method in the consumers eyes, DEMETER strictly defines the beginning of conversion as starting with the first year of inspection.
Conversion, retroactive approval - CH Regulation/Ordinance 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
The conversion period lasts 2 years, starting on the first of January.
With the exception for sprouts and mushroom production the Swiss Ordinance does not allow a shortening of the conversion period: While the EU Regulation 2092/91 offers the possibility for retrospective approval in cases, where previous management methods are proved to be in compliance with the Regulation (approval as 'organic' after 6 months of first inspection for pastures or immediate approval for other plots if last conventional measure happened more than 3 years ago). For reasons of credibility in the consumers eyes, the Swiss Ordinance strictly defines the beginning of conversion starting with the first year of inspection on the spot.
Full farm conversion - AT Bio Austria General Standard 2006
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
Conversion of the entire holding is a prerequisite for the certification as an organic farm of Bio Austria. Beekeeping and fish farming are the only exceptions, and may be practiced conventionally.
The Bio Austria has the additional requirement to convert the whole farm and not just the production unit, as defined in EU Regulation 2092/91 as littlest unit to convert (annex I B 1.5 ff) and Annex III A.1. §. 3 which defines the requirements for certification of the production unit, which can farmed by the same company/farm. Therefore it is not necessary based on the EU Regulation to convert the whole farm. The main reason is to create high consumer confidence (exclusion of fraud and mistakes).
Full farm conversion - CH Bio Suisse Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/unknown.png
BIO SUISSE requires organic certification of the whole farm with all the enterprises, including arable land, perennial crops and animal production.
BIO SUISSE standards contain an additional restriction not included in the EU Regulation 2092/91. BIO SUISSE standards do not allow non-organic and organic enterprises to be operated by the same manager with the exception of the stepped conversion of wine, fruit or ornamental plants production enterprises, whereas the EU Regulation does allow organic and non-organic enterprises on the same farm. The prohibition of organic and non-organic split production avoids potential problems with the consumer credibility of organic farming and minimises the danger of fraud. The BIO SUISSE standards in this respect comply with the Swiss government regulation.
Full farm conversion - CH Demeter Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
Full farm conversion of the whole operation to organic is required by DEMETER and is applied for arable land, perennial crops and animal husbandry all the same. The farmer has to attend a training on bio-dynamic farming and must prove knowledge on bio-dynamic farming.
DEMETER standards do not allow a split production of DEMETER and conventional production areas within the same farm or by the same manager, whereas EU Regulation 2092/91 does allow split production within the farm by the same manager. Furthermore, DEMETER requires the farmers to attend a training on bio-dynamic farming, whereas EU Regulation does not rule the question of capacity building among organic farmers. The personal committment required from a farm manager towards bio-dynamic farming does not comply with the thought of having conventional areas within the same operation.
Full farm conversion - CH regulation/Ordinance 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
The whole farm must be under organic management
The Swiss Ordinance requires full farm conversion. In exceptional cases split production of fruit crops and vine as conventional crops on a organic farm can be admitted. The EU Regulation 2092/91 does allow split production (conventional and organic by the same manager) for all branches in a farm. In order not to jeopardize the credibility of organic farming in the consumers perception and in order to minimise the danger of fraud in the farms, the Swiss Ordinance generally insists in full organic management of all areas in an operation.
Full farm conversion - DE Bioland Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
The farm has to be converted completely. In exceptional cases the conversion can be realised step by step, but must be completed at the latest after 5 years. (Bioland production standards, 9.2.2 Conversion of Total Business; Bioland production standards, 9.2.5 Conversion Deadlines)
The BIOLAND standard has the additional restriction of whole farm conversion, where according to the EU Regulation 2092/91 single but clearly separated farming units can be converted to organic farming. BIOLAND has maximum time limit to complete the conversion period, wereas the EU regulation has no time indication.. In order to increase credibility of organic farming, to minimise risks of contamination or fraud. To consider specific circumstances of single farms, that impede the whole farm conversion in one step.
Full farm conversion - DE Naturland 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
A Naturland producer contract implies the obligation to convert and apply the standards on all areas of a farm, managed under the responsibility of one farm manager. (NL standards on production 2005: Part A.I.2.Producer contract)
The NATURLAND standard requires conversion of the whole farm whreas the EU Regulation 2092/91 allows the conversion of separated farm units. Whole farm conversion is required in order to reduce the danger of contamination or fraud and to safeguard organic integrity.
Full farm conversion - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
Conversion of the whole farm including own and leased areas, buildings and animals shall be started within 4 years after the beginning of the conversion according to DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production, 2006, Section 2.1: Conversion to organic agricultural production.
It is generally required that the whole farm including land, buildings and animals is converted, and the conversion of all land and animals shall be started within 4 calendar years after entering into conversion according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production, October 2006. According to the EU Regulation 2092/91 Article 6, Annex I A, Article 1 and Annex I B, Article 2 there is no requirement on conversion of the whole farm and therefore also no requirement on how long time the conversion of the whole farm is allowed to take. In the DK Governmental Guidelines there are some derogation possibilities, which are described in Section 2.1 and 2.2, but they will need individual approval by the certification and inspection authority, the Plant Directorate. Organic farming is a land based activity with a holistic approach. It is not logic to convert a piece of land or a special plant or animal production while leaving the rest of the production conventional.
Full farm conversion - Demeter International 2005
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
The conversion of the whole farm to the Biodynamic method in one step is required and shall be completed after a maximum of five years. Exemptions can be approved if the whole farm is managed organically and the conversion to biodynamic of individual areas following the crop rotation is justified (Appendix 7, APP 20 and 22). Parallel production is not allowed. Exemptions for perennial crops can be approved (Appendix 7, APP 21). A farm manager may not manage a Demeter farm and a conventional farm in the same district. (DI production standards, 7.1. Conversion and the production manager; DI production standards, Appemdix 7, APP 20, 21, 22)
The DI standard contains additional requirements. After 5 years of conversion, conventional units are no longer admitted on the farm. The whole farm should be converted in one step. The same person cannot manage one Demeter and another conventional farm at the same time. According to the EU Regulation 2092/91 separated conventional units and organic units can exist on the same farm. Conversion is a process of change encompassing the many developmental steps that the enterprise goes through on the way to a new state of equilibrium.
Full farm conversion - Italian Organic Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
When the organic operator starts its conversion period, he has 3 years to have his whole farm certified. No parallel production is allowed after this period.
The EU Regulation 2092/91 accepts parallel production and mixed farms under certain restrictions. Parallel production is prohibited in order to avoid potential frauds and unintentional contaminations. However the gradual conversion of farm and productions within a three year conversion plan is allowed. The plan has to be accepted by the certification body.
Full farm conversion - Nature et Progrès Standards 2002 Under Nature et Progres standards, when the farmer starts the conversion period, he has 5 years to get the whole farm certified organic. Nature et Progres standards require that ultimately the whole production of the farm be organic, whereas the EU Regulation 2092/91 accepts the presence of non-organic productions. Presence of organic and conventional products on the same farm is not consistent and a source of potential fraud or accidental pollution. However, each farmer needs time to adapt his farm system and therefore five years are given to satisfy this obligation.
Full farm conversion - PL Ekoland Standards 2005 Conversion of the entire holding is required for the certification of any EKOLAND organic farm. EKOLAND standards require the whole farm to be converted, and not only the production unit, as defined in the EU Regulation 2092/91. The main reason is to keep the green image of the Association and to assure consumer trust.
Full farm conversion - SI BIODAR 2002
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
SI BIODAR standards require a successful whole farm conversion as a condition for the use of BIODAR logo, with the only possible exception of beekeeping.
BIODAR standards do not allow a parallel production of different production branches in the farm, with exception of beekeeping (1.1), whereas the EU Regulation 2092/91 does allow a split conventional and organic production by the same manager. Whole farm conversion is a measure to guarantee transparency of organic production to the consumer and minimize fraud or unwanted pollution. Another important reason is the low average size of Slovenian farms that makes a controllable split production hardly possible.
Parallel production, crops - CH Regulation/Ordinance 2005
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
Parallel production of the same crops is only possible in farms undergoing a step by step conversion and only for the production areas of wine, perennial fruit and ornamental plants (full separation of audit trail must be granted and inspected).
According to the Swiss Ordinance only during a step-by-step conversion period, some exception for the parallel production in perennial fruit crops is possible in the operation. EU Regulation 2092/91 does at any time accept the parallel production of different varieties of the same crop (if clearly distinguishable), if segregation is granted and inspection is performed in the conventional production unit of the operation. By disallowing parallel production the farm situation is more transparent and inspection is easier. These measures support the credibility of organic farming.
Parallel production, crops - PRO BIO 2004 Parallel production of the same crops is only possible in farms with areas, newly integrated to the conversion period and only for the production areas of grasslands and perennial crops. Any parallel production of the same arable crop is prohibited. Parallel production in animal husbandry is not possible. According to PRO-BIO policy, only during the conversion period is there some exceptions for the possible parallel production of perennial crops and grassland. EU Regulation 2092/91 accepts the parallel production of different varieties of the same crop (if clearly distinguishable), if segregation is granted and inspection is performed in the conventional production unit of the operation. In order to maintain credibility of organic products parallel production is generally not allowed. The exception gives the possibility of inclusion of new areas to organic farming.