Organic Rules and Certification

All differences in one table by EU regulation

  • EC Council Regulation No. 2092/91
    • Annex I. Principles of organic production and processing
      • Product handling, storage, processing, transportation and packaging - not in EC Reg
        • Processing and manufactoring
Go back to overview Go to complete documents for this section
Title Description Difference Justification and Comments
Harvesting and processing - DE Bioland Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
The high nutritional quality of the products should be considered and preserved while harvesting and processing the products. (Bioland production standards, 5.1.6 Harvesting and Preparation; Bioland production standards, 5.2.5 Preparation (herb cultivation)
The scope of the BIOLAND standards have requirements to preserve nutritional quality of produce at harvesting and processing. The EU Regulation 2092/91 does not refer to the nutritional quality of the products. To preserve and ensure the high quality of BIOLAND agricultural products throughout the whole production chain.
Meat, tenderising methods - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005 The use of tenderising substances on live animals is prohibited. Electrical tenderisation of meat may be used with Soil Association permission. Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraphs 42.8.7 and 42.10.6. Soil Association standards are more detailed than EU Regulation 2092/91. Soil Association standards prohibit the use of tenderising substances on live animals, but they allow the use of electrical tenderisation of meat, with their permission. EU Regulation does not refer to procedures for the tenderisation of meat. Introduction of tenderising enzymes into the vascular systems of animals before slaughter is an invasive technique with potential welfare problems.
Processing and storage - Italian Organic Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
The Italian Organic Standard (IOS) defines clearly which procedures and methods are allowed for the processing and storage of organic products. Organic food should be produced by means of processing technologies and procedures based on biological, physical and mechanical methods and in a way which maintains the qualities of each ingredient and of the finished product. Specific rules are set for filtration techniques, clarification adjuvants, preservation procedures and storage conditions.
The Italian organic standard specifies a list of possible processes for each kind of food, whereas EU Regulation 2092/91 does not. There is a need for detailed rules for the processing and handling of organic products.
Processing, filtering techniques - SE KRAV 2006
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
Filtration techniques that lead to chemical changes on a molecular level are only allowed after a special examination by KRAV. Filters that contain asbestos or affect the product negatively are not allowed (KRAV standards paragraph 9.2.3).
Filtration techniques are not covered in EU Regulation 2092/91. The KRAV standards are more elaborate on filtration techniques.
Processing, general requirements - FR Regulation 2000
/style/images/fileicons/other.png
There is a list of possible processes for each kind of food (milk, meat, vegetables). For example, egg products have only 10 possible processes (heating, cooling, freezing, breaking...)
French organic regulation specifies a list of possible processes for each kind of food, whereas EU Regulation 2092/91 does not. Processing has an effect on the nutritional quality and taste of the final product. Organic products should be unique in both of these aspects. Therefore only certain processes should be allowed.
Processing, general requirements - SE KRAV 2006
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
The KRAV standards list which processing methods that are allowed for processing of organic production. Allowed methods are Mechanical and physical processes, – Biological processes such as fermentation and brewing (such as for example using lactic acid cultures and mould cultures), – Enzymatic processes where the effect is to coagulate (such as rennet) or cleaving substances (such as the enzyme amylase), – Extraction. Only water, ethanol or fats may be used as solvents, – Smoking, – Precipitation, Irradiation is not permitted. KRAV does not permit processes that lead to the creation of foreign molecules. (KRAV standards paragraph 9.2.3).
In EU Regulation 2092/91 irradiation is not permitted. Which processes that are allowed are not stated. The KRAV standards are more restrictive when limiting the processes which can be used. The prohibition for not allowing processes that leads to molecules which does not exist in nature is not covered in the EU Regulation 2092/91. For consumers it is probably important that organic products are done with processes which also can happen in nature.
Processing, general requirements - SP CCPAE Cataluña Rules 2003
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
CCPAE (Cataluña) has a list of possible processes for each kind of food (milk, meat, vegetables). The CCAPE Cataluña has general organic standards revised on 17th January 2003, with 3 chapters devoted to organic food processing. It can be download in the webpage www.ccpae.org
CCPAE organic regulation specifies a list of possible processes for each kind of food, whereas EU Regulation 2092/91 does not. Processing has an effect on the nutritional quality and taste of the final product. Organic products should be unique in both of these aspects. Therefore only certain processes and methods should be allowed.
Processing, mixed production - Italian Organic Standards 2005
/style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png /style/images/fileicons/text_plain.png
Specific conditions are required if the same unit handles and processes both organic and conventional products.
The Italian organic standard specifies precautions to be taken in parallel processing of organic and non organic food, whereas EU Regulation 2092/91 does not. There is a need for detailed rules for the processing and handling of organic food.
Processing, preservatives, milk - SE KRAV 2006
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
When preserving milk only bacteria cultures and acidification substances of plant origin may be used. Chemical feed preservatives including formic, propionic and acetic acid are not allowed (KRAV standards paragraph 5.3.28).
EU Regulation 2092/91 Annex I paragraph 4.17 and annex II D1.5 allows the following preservatives for animal feed: E 200 Sorbic acid, E 236 Formic acid, E 260 Acetic acid, E 270 Lactic acid, E 280 Propionic acid, E 330 Citric acid. On organic production as little chemical preservatives as possible should be used.