Organic Rules and Certification

All differences in one table by EU regulation

  • EC Council Regulation No. 2092/91
    • Annex V. Labelling
      • Indication that products are covered by the inspection scheme - Annex IV A
Go back to overview Go to complete documents for this section
Title Description Difference Justification and Comments
Labelling claims, shops and supermarkets - SE KRAV 2006
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
There are requirements for how a shop or a supermarket can call themselves KRAV authorised. They shall contribute to increased availability of organic products through having a wide range certified products and have a well informed staff. The range of products shall reflect what is available on the market and the objective is that the consumer shall be able to choose organic alternatives from all product groups. The standard also covers repacking of products at the shop or supermarket. (KRAV standards chapter 15).
Standards for shops and supermarkets are not covered in EU Regulation 2092/91. To authorise shops for handling of organic products and for promotion of organic production will increase the knowledge about organic agriculture and the availability of products. With well trained personnel it also increases the security that organic products are handled in the right way and not commingled with other products.
Standards, restaurants and industrial kitchens - SE KRAV 2006
/style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png /style/images/fileicons/application_pdf.png
The standards for restaurants and industrial kitchens cover the whole or parts of the operations. Restaurants with á la carte menu need to have two approved main courses daily. On a lunch menu there shall at least be one approved course weekly. An approved dish shall have 100% KRAV certified ingredients, if organic ingredients are not available, a conventional ingredient can be used but at least 70% of the dish shall be organic. Only food additives and processing aids allowed by the KRAV standards can be used in a certified main course (includes additives and processing aids in conventional ingredients). Bread, salads, drinks, coffee, tea, ketchup etc shall also be possible to the extent possible. A certified buffet there must be a complete meal of KRAV certified products. A certified breakfast shall contain certified products in several of the type of food served for breakfast (bread, cheese, yoghurt, marmalade, breakfast cereals, fruits, vegetables, eggs etc). A certified café shall have KRAV certified coffee, tea, milk, sugar, fruit drinks, sandwiches, cakes and fruit if these products are served. There is also standards for handling of organic products so that no commingling with conventional products occur or contamination from cleaning. There are also standards for the labelling of dishes and statements about organic ingredients shall be made so consumers are sure which ingredients/ dishes are organic. (KRAV standards chapter 16).
EU Regulation 2092/91 does not have any specific standards for restaurants or industrial kitchens. More and more food is consumed outside of homes. There is an interest both by consumers and by restaurants and other industrial kitchens to eat or serve organic food. The KRAV standards are relatively open and are set with the argument to make it possible for several to start to serve organic food. Labelling has to be clear so that consumers are well informed. In the EU there are different interpretations in different Member States if restaurants are covered or not.