Organic Rules and Certification

All differences in one table by Subjects

  • Subject Areas
    • Perennial crops
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Title Description Difference Justification and Comments
Farm diversity - Demeter International 2005
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Demeter farms are required to integrate ruminants or equidae. Exemptions can be approved by the respective certifying organisation. In market gardens and in enterprises having solely perennial crops, the requirement to have their own animals is not obligatory if manures, compost, green manures, and preparation usage is particularly intensive. (DI production standards, 5.1. Requirement to have livestock DI production standards, Appendix 7, APP 4)
Demeter farms are not regulated by the EU Regulation 2092/91, and there is no requirement to have any type of livestock on an organic farm according to the EU Regulation. Animal husbandry, with the accompanying fodder production is an important part of the agricultural enterprise. With respect to the development of the enterprise, the farm organism cannot do without livestock. This applies to the ruminant in particular. The fodder plants and the well-balanced manure that comes into being because of cattle, contribute considerably through the enlivening of the soil, to the long term flourishing of a farm. The harmonious co-operation of mankind with the three kingdoms of nature can lead to a living, ensouled farm organism.
Int. IFOAM Standards 2005: Floor cover in perennial crops
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For perennial crops, the certifying body shall set minimum standards for orchard/plantation floor cover and/or diversity or refuge plantings in the orchard. (4.3.2.)
EC Regulation does not address the matter. An appropriate cover crop helps to prevent erosion and loss of nutrients in perennial crops.
Livestock management, perennial cropping systems - Demeter International 2004
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Farms with intensive vegetable production or perennial crops should keep animals on the farm or at least cooperate with another biodynamic farm to set up a fertilising programme based on animal manure. (DI production standards 3.4.Market gardens, field vegetables, hops and other perennial crops)
The DI standard requires that animals are being reared on farms with intensive horticulture production or perennial cropping systems; where as in the EU Regulation 2092/91 no such requirement is stated. The fertilizing programme should be based on animals kept on the farm in order to promote the development of the farm as an individual living organism by using the own animal manure. Animal husbandry, with the accompanying fodder production is an important part of the agricultural enterprise. With respect to the development of the enterprise, the farm organism cannot do without livestock. This applies to the ruminant in particular. The fodder plants and the well-balanced manure that comes into being because of cattle, contribute considerably through the enlivening of the soil, to the long term flourishing of a farm. The harmonious co-operation of mankind with the three kingdoms of nature can lead to a living, ensouled farm organism.
Plant production, location, hops - DE Bioland 2005
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Organic hop plantation next to conventional plantations must be provided with protective planting at the latest within 5 years after the beginning of the conversion period. Newly created hop cultivation is only allowed on bordering or isolated areas. The minimum distance to conventional plantations must be 10 m. Otherwise hop harvested from the outer rows cannot be marketed with reference to organic agriculture. The creation of areas of ecological compensation are required for hop cultivation in specific areas. (Bioland production standards, 5.7 Hop Cultivation, 5.7.1 Location and Area)
The BIOLAND standard is more detailed than the EU Regulation 2092/91. In the EU Regulation there is a general requirement of a clear separation of the organic production unit from any other production unit, however distances to conventional plantantions are not defined. Furthermore under BIOLAND standards in case of suspicion of contamination a product cannot be marketed with reference to organic agriculture unless it has been proven that the suspicion was wrong. Bioland is explicitely requiring an ecological compensation with diversified areas, whereas the EU Regulation has not such a specific requirement. In order to avoid contamination with objectionable substances. In order to cope with the ecological principle of organic agriculture.
Plant production, support stakes, hops - DE Bioland Standards 2005
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Wooden constructions to support hop cultivation may only be made from wood of native species and can only be treated with environmentally friendly substances. (Bioland production standards, 5.7. Hop cultivation, 5.7.2 Support Material)
The BIOLAND standard is more detailed. The EU Regulation 2092/91does not refer to the characteristics of supporting material for perennial crops. In order not to contribute to the destruction of tropical forests and comply with the holistic approach of organic agriculture as well as to avoid contamination with objectionable substances.
Plant production, support stakes, perennial crops - DE Biolaand Standards 2005
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No tropical woods can be used as supporting material. Tropical or sub-tropical woods may not be used as supporting material. The tropical grasses, bamboo and tonkin are permissible. (Bioland production standards, 5.5.3 Supporting Material; Bioland production standards, 5.6.2 Supporting Material )
The BIOLAND standard is more detailed. The EU Regulation 2092/91 does not refer to the use of supporting materials in orchards and viticulture. In order not to contribute to the destruction of ecosystems in the tropics. This aspect refers to the holistic and ecological approach of organic farming.
Soil management, perennial crops - DE Bioland 2005
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Vineyards and hop plantations must have undercropping. In dry periods and in new plantations parts of the soil in vineyards can be kept without vegetation for three months. If this period is extended, the soil must be covered with organic material. While establishing an undercropping system, the nitrogen balance must be considered and legume species must be part of the composition. (Bioland production standards, 5.6 Viticulture, 5.6.1 Soil Care, Greening and Fertilising; Bioland production standards, 5.7. Hop cultivation, 5.7.3 Greening)
The EU Regulation 2092/91 does not require soil coverage for perennial cropping systems as BIOLAND does. There is only the general provision to use legume species and green manure in order to maintain and enhance soil fertility. In order to reduce the problems and disadvantages of the permanent mono-culture (erosion, problems with pests and diseases) in vineyards and to ensure the production of grapes, juice and wine of a high quality. Undercropping and soil cover can contribute to soil conservation and avoid erosion. Additionally habitat for beneficial insects is provided as a contribution to a balanced ecosystem.
Soil management, perennial crops - DE Naturland Standards 2005
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In permanent cropping systems the soil must be covered with vegetation (with exemptions). (NL standards on production: Part B. I.Plant production 1. Humus management and fertilization; Part B. VI. Fruit cultivation, 1. Humus management and fertilization; Part B. VII. Viniculture and wine production 1. Treatment of the soil)
The NATURLAND standard is more specific as there is no such requirement of soil cover in the EU Regulation 2092/91. To keep the soil covered with vegetation is a vital instrument to maintain and increase the soil fertility.