Organic Rules and Certification

All differences in one table by Subjects

  • Subject Areas
    • Permitted inputs (positive lists)
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Title Description Difference Justification and Comments
Animal fodder, animal origin - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005 There is a limited list of feeds of animal origin permitted for feeding to livestock. Certain items on this list are permitted to be fed only to non-herbivores. Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraph 10.13.23. Soil Association standards are more restrictive than EU Regulation 2092/91. Soil Association standards specify that fish molluscan or crustacean autolysates, hydrolysates and proteolysates obtained by enzyme action, fish oil, and fishmeal may be fed only to non-herbivores. EU Regulation allows feeding of these products to both herbivores and non-herbivores. Feeding fish products to herbivores is incompatible with their innate behaviour and therefore contradicts the principles of care and fairness.
Animal fodder, origin - CH Demeter Standards 2005
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Only in pig and chicken production, purchase of bio-dynamic off-farm fodder (cereals) is unlimited. For all other animals the quantity of purchased fodder must not exceed 20% of dry matter equivalent of the annual need for each category.
DEMETER standards contain further restrictions since the standard limits the purchase of fodder at 20% (related to the yearly dry matter equivalent needed for each animal category). Only for pig and chicken rearing are no limits set. The EU Regulation 2092/91 requires 50% of the fodder to be grown on the farm if feasible, and if not it should be purchased from other organic farms. The self supply with fodder for ruminants is a principle aim within a bio-dynamic farm. The production of enough roughage adds to a closed and balanced production cycle within the operation and therefore purchase of fodder is restricted for ruminants.
Cleaning agents - SE KRAV 2006
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Cleaning agents used for cleaning of all kind of facilities and equipment (areas for production, processing, handling and storages) shall be eco-labeled if available. If there is no environmental labeled product avaiable the Precautionary Principle shall be used. (KRAV Standards paragraph 2.12.10.)
In EU Regulation 2092/91 there is a list of products allowed for cleaning and disinfection of buildings for animal husbandry but not for areas for storing, handling or processing. The standards requires the use of the most environmental friendly product whenever possible in all kind of production. In Sweden there are two systems for eco labelling of cleaning agents, mainly for use in private homes but some are also for professional use.
Fertilizers, origin - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005
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Soil Association permission is required to use non-organic animal manure or plant waste, which must be used only as a complement to the soil fertility management. Permission will be granted only if information is provided about the material and why it is needed. The types of non-organic agricultural and food by-products that may be used are subject to detailed, specified restrictions, regarding the stocking densities and husbandry systems, as well as the stacking or composting of the material. These include straw, farmyard manure, stable manure, poultry manure (from certain production systems with specified maximum stocking densities for each), straw-based pig manure, food processing by-products, plant wastes and by-products, as well as non-organic slurry, mushroom composts and worm composts from the systems specified. Dirty water from non-organic systems may be applied to in-conversion land. In addition, the Soil Association standards specify that non-organic slurry must have been aerated, pig and poultry manure must have been properly composted, stacked for 12 months, or stacked for 6 months and turned twice, and other non-organic livestock manure and plant waste must have been stacked for half the above-mentioned times or properly composted. Soil Association may request a soil or manure analysis to check the heavy metal levels. (Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraphs 4.7.5-4.7.7 and 4.7.17.)
Soil Association standards specify that only certain types of manure and plant wastes from non-organic production or processing systems may be permitted to complement soil fertility management. EU Regulation 2092/91 specifies "need recognised by the inspection body". The Soil Association standards aim to avoid providing an organic farming demand for manure products of livestock systems where the animal welfare is compromised by lack of bedding, or by excessive stocking densities or movement restrictions. Soil Association standards try to avoid potential organic consumer health problems by requiring composting or stacking time for the degradation of residues of prohibited inputs or veterinary medicines before application of non-organic manure and plant wastes to organic crops. Consumer health and long-term soil fertility concerns are the reasons why analysis may be required for heavy metal levels.
Fertilizers, substrates, guano - UK Soil Association Organic Standards 2005 It is prohibited to fertilize the soil with fresh blood, guano, Chilean nitrate, urea, or slaked lime or quicklime. Soil Association Organic Standards. Paragraphs 4.8.12. Soil Association standards have further restrictions than EU Regulation 2092/91, where for example guano is permitted as fertiliser where the need is recognised by the inspection body. It is prohibited by the Soil Association standards. Guano extraction is unsustainable on a large scale because of habitat damage and limited reserves. Historically, guano was used as a major nitrate source, but nitrogen fixed from the atmosphere should be the main source of nitrate in organic farming.
Livestock housing, bedding material - DE Naturland 2005
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Straw used for animal bedding must come from organic farms. In the case of non-availability it must be purchased from low intensity cultivation systems. (NL standards on production, Part B.1. Animal husbandry 1.)
The NATURLAND standard contains further requirements. The EU Regulation 2092/91 does not require the bedding material to come from organic or low intensity sources. To avoid contamination with harmful substances. Most types of animals will eat part of the bedding material.
Livestock housing, cleaning - DE Naturland 2005
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Only the products listed in the corresponding appendix can be used for cleaning of equipment used in animal production. (NL standards on production, Part B.II.5.Shed hygiene and appendix 8)
The lists of admissible products are very similar. However on the NATURLAND list, formic acid and formaldehyde are not included. Exclusion of hazardous substances.
Manure fertilizers, origin - SE KRAV 2006
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Manure from beef cattle in slatted floor boxes, conventional pig production, battery hens and caged fur animals are not permitted as fertilizers. There are exceptions for pig production with less then 50 animals a year and when the animals are kept in big boxes with straw bedding. There is also an exception for producers with beef cattle in slatted floors or conventional pig production which can use the manure from the conventional animals if they at the same time start to convert the animal husbandry to organic (KRAV standards paragraph 4.3.3).
In the EU Regulation 2092/91 the use of manure from ‘factory farming’ is not allowed. The KRAV standards are stricter than the Swedish interpretation of ‘factory farming’ in the EU Regulation. If the KRAV standards are stricter than the other countries it is not possible to assess the interpretations as the interpretations are not official.
Mushroom production, protective measures - DE Bioland Standards 2005
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Substrate can only be disinfected using thermal processes. For the disinfection of equipment only alcohol or acetic acid can be used. The application of pyrethrum is not allowed in mushroom production. (Bioland production standards, 5.4.3 Disinfection and Plant Protection)
The BIOLAND standard has additional requirements than the EU Regulation 2092/91 which does not explicitly refer to the disinfection of substrate. Pyrethrum can be used against pests. The regulation regarding substances for cleaning and disinfection only refers to animal production facilities and equipment. To avoid contamination with harmful substances.
Mushroom production, substrate - DE Bioland Standards 2005
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Substrates must consist of materials from BIOLAND certified farms or at least certified organic origin. Substrates other than of BIOLAND origin can only be used after approval by BIOLAND. Organic animal manure to be used as substrate component requires organic bedding material. In the case of conventional wood, the origin must be traceable and if needed an analysis completed to show its harmlessness. Peat is admissible as top layer. Mineral substrate components can be used, if listed in the corresponding annex (10.1.4.). (Bioland production standards, 5.4 Mushroom Production 5.4.1 Basic Principles; Bioland production standards, 5.4.2 Substrate; Bioland production standards, 10.1.4 Mineral Complementing Fertilisers)
The BIOLAND standard is more demanding. According to the EU Regulation 2092/91 up to 25% of the substrate can consist of certain types of conventional animal manure, if these are not available in organic quality. This is not allowed according to the BIOLAND standards. To ensure BIOLAND / organic quality throughout the whole production chain and to avoid contamination with objectionable substances.
Mushroom production, substrate and inoculum - DE Naturland Standards 2005
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Inoculums and substrate materials of NATURLAND or equivalent certification must be used. If these are not available, materials from other certified organic origin can be purchased after approval. The use of certain disinfection agents during the productive period is prohibited. The empty facilities can be cleaned and disinfected with the substances listed in the appendix 8. (NL standards on production, Part B.IV. Mushroom cultivation)
The provisions are more detailed than the EU Regulation 2092/91 and in some aspects shave additional requirements. The use of substrates is regulated in the corresponding annex of the EU Regulation where up to 25% of the substrate can consist of conventional animal manure if the components required are not available in organic quality. The use of inoculums and disinfection agents for mushroom production is not regulated in the EU Regulation. To ensure NATURLAND quality throughout the whole production chain, to avoid contamination with objectionable substances from conventional substrate material or from cleaning agents.
Peat - CH Demeter 2005
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Peat can constitute only 70% of the substratum for the production of seedlings.
DEMETER restricts the use of peat to seedling production and within substrata to a maximum 70% whereas the EU Regulation 2092/91 only lists peat as admitted 'fertilizer' limited to horticulture (market gardening, floriculture, arboriculture, nursery). Peat is a very limited resource which should be used as little as possible to ensure supplies for future generations. Furthermore peat production infringes on natural habitats, which is not in line with the aim for sound production methods of organic farming.
Peat - CH Regulation/Ordinance 2005
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Peat can only be used for growing seedlings and marsh beds. Not more than 70% of peat can be added to substratum for seedlings.
The Swiss Ordinance restricts the use of peat to seedling production and within substrata to maximum 70% whereas the EU Regulation 2092/91 only lists peat as admitted 'fertilizer' limited to horticulture (market gardening, floriculture, arboriculture, nursery). Peat is a very limited natural resource which should be used as little as possible to ensure the supply for future generations. Peat production damages natural habitats which is not in line with the sound production methods which organic farming is aiming for.
Peat - DE Naturland Standards 2005
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The components that can be used in soil and substrate preparations are defined by the corresponding annexes. The use of synthetic substrate materials is prohibited. Peat can be used in substrates and may not exceed 80% of the mixture for seedlings and 50% of the mixture for potted plants (with exemptions). The cultivation of crops without using soil or substrate is not allowed. NL standards on production: Part B. III. Market gardening 2. Part B. V. Cultivation of ornamental plants, herbaceous perennials, shrubs, Christmas trees 2 Appendices 1,2 and 9)
The NATURLAND standard has additional requirments and restrictions than the EU Regulation 2092/91. The list of components, that can be used is more restricted, i.e. composted community household wastes (appendix 9) are excluded, as well as liquid or semi-liquid manure and chicken manure from conventional origin (appendix 1). In the EU Regulation there is no limit for the amount of peat to be used. Synthetic substrates are not regulated. The cultivation of crops without soil or substrate is not regulated. Protection of the natural peat deposits. The vital soil is an indispensable element of organic farming.
Peat - Int. IFOAM Standards 2005 Peat is listed in Appendix 1 on the positive list, but may not be used for soil conditioning EU Regulation 2092/91 only lists peat as admitted 'fertilizer' limited to horticulture (market gardening, floriculture, arboriculture, nursery), whereas IFOAM restricts the application by excluding soil conditionning. No justification was given.
Plant and livestock production, inputs certification - SE KRAV 2006
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The KRAV standards cover certification of inputs in organic production. The areas covered are – animal management agents – plant protection agents – plant growth stimulants – soil conditioning agents – fertilizers – sowing and potting soil – pesticide and disinfection agents in storage areas The standards are based on the relevant standards for plant production and animal husbandry with additions and clarifications. Only products which contain 100% organic ingredients can be called organic all other certified inputs can be labelled with a special logo which stating “approved for organic production”. (KRAV standards chapter 12).
Certification of inputs is not covered in EU Regulation 2092/91. The certification of inputs is a help to organic farmers to easily find which inputs that are allowed or not. The producer of inputs can also more easily communicate that a product fulfils the KRAV standards. Interestingly many consumer products are also certified to this system showing that consumer does not only want organic food but also potting soil and nutrients for flowers.
Plant protection, carriers and wetting agents - SE KRAV Standards 2006
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The KRAV standards requires that carriers and wetting agents used in plant protection products are examined and accepted by KRAV (4.4.4). There are simple criteria in the standard and also a reference to the IFOAM Basic Standards criteria for evaluation of these additives. (KRAV Standards Article 4.4.4. In appendix 4, 12 accepted carriers and wetting agents are listed.)
This is an additional requirement compared to the EU Regulation 2092/91. The EU Regulation does not have any specific requirements on carriers or wetting agents. For the organic farmer it is important to have a knowledge about all substances used on the farmland. It is known that some of the carriers and wetting agents also have biological effects.
Plant protection, copper - SE KRAV 2006
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Copper can be used for plant protection but only in the amounts which are allowed by the standards for heavy metals, 0,5 kg per ha per year (KRAV standards paragraph 4.4.2).
EU Regulation 2092/91 allows 6 kg of copper per ha per year from 2006 and the use will be further restricted in the coming years. In Sweden copper has not been used in organic farming. Copper is a heavy metal with environmental effects. Wine is not grown in Sweden.
Plant protection, copper - AT Bio CH Bio Suisse Standard 2005
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Copper preparations are admitted for fungal disease control. Arable crops can not be treated with copper, except for potatoes, vegetables and hops. The annual amount of copper applied is clearly restricted for individual crops to a maximum 4 kg/ha metalic copper, for apple and pears 1.5 kg/ha and for berries 2 kg/ha).
Copper application is restricted to lower quantities and in terms of crops (application rate between 1.5-4 kg pure metallic copper, arable crops excluded except potatoes). EU Regulatoin 2092/91 admits 8kg of copper till the end of 2006 and maximum 6 kg of copper afterwards: no restrictions are made in terms of crops being treated with copper preparations. Copper is being accumulated in the soil: in order to promote sound soil fertility, any accumulation of heavy metals should be avoided.
Plant protection, copper - CH Regulance/Ordinance 2005
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Copper may be applied against fungi in plant production. The limit is at 4kg/ha per year metallic copper or not more than 20kg averaged over 5 consecutive years.
Copper application is restricted to lower quantities (4 kg in general, not more than 6 kg for wine growing). EU Regulation allows 8 kg of copper until the end of 2005 and max 6 kg of copper from January 2006 onwards: no restrictions are made in terms of crops being treated with copper preparations. Copper is being accumulated in the soil: in order to promote sound soil fertility, any accumulation of heavy metals should be avoided - therefore copper applications are restricted to max 4 kg/ha metallic copper
Plant protection, copper - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Use of copper is not allowed for plant protection purposes in any organic or conventional plant cultures in Denmark. The DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production, October 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark" does not mention copper or any copper compounds. Copper is not allowed according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production, October 2006, while limited quantities of certain Copper compounds may be used according to Annex II B, Section IV of the EU Regulation 2092/91. Copper is a heavy metal which may accumulate in the soil and have a negative influence on the soil flora and fauna. Therefore the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, which is the public authority responsible for evaluation and approval of all pesticides to be used in Denmark, has banned the use of copper products for plant protection purposes in Denmark.
Plant protection, copper - Int. IFOAM Standards 2005
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Copper preparates are admitted and listed in the IFOAM positive list Appendix 3.
Whereas IFOAM restricts the application of copper to 8kg/ha and year, EU Regulation 2092/91 admits 8kg of copper till the end of 2005 and max 6kg of copper from the year 2006 onward. Copper is being accumulated in the soil: in order to promote sound soil fertility, any accumulation of heavy metals should be avoided - therefore a restriction on the use of metalic copper is necessary.
Plant protection, copper - NO Governmental Regulation 2005
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The use of copper substances as plant protection products is not allowed in organic production.
The EU Regulation 2092/91 permits copper preparates (with restrictions). Copper preparates are an environmental strain and the use should be restricted. There are no productions in Norway where the use of copper preparates is crucial.
Plant protection, microorganisms - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Only the named microorganism species, Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana, Coniothyrium minitans, Phlebiopsis gigantea, Pseudomonas chlororaphis, Streptomyces griseovirides, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma ploysporium and Verticillium lecanii are approved for biological control according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark". Only certain named microorganism species are approved for biological control in organic plant production in Denmark whereas the species allowed for biological control are not specified in the EU Regulation 2092/91, Annex II B, Section II. The microorganism species approved for biological control in organic plant production in Denmark are the ones which have been approved for use in conventional and organic plant production by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, which is the public authority responsible for evaluation and approval of all pesticides to be used in Denmark.
Plant protection, substances - DE Bioland 2005
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The plant protection agents listed in the corresponding annex 10.2. can only be used, if other agricultural measures to strengthen the health of the cropping system have been unsuccessful. Equipment for the application of plant protection agents must be free from residues of objectionable substances. The use of synthetic pesticides and growth regulators is prohibited. (Bioland production standards, 3.7 Plant Protection 3.7.1 Basic Principles; Bioland production standards, 3.7.2 Permissible Measures; Bioland production standards, 3.7.3 Prohibitions; Bioland production standards, 10.2.1 Biological and Biotechnical Measures; Bioland production standards, 10.2.2 Plant Protection and Care Agents; Bioland production standards, 10.2.2.1 Generally Permissible Agents; Bioland production standards, 10.2.2.2 Agents only Permissible in Horticulture and Permanent Cultures as well as in the mentioned crops)
The BIOLAND standard has further requirements to the EU Regulation 2092/91. There are certain (mainly natural) products on the BIOLAND list of permissible products, that are not mentioned in the EU Regulation.: i.e. stone meal, bentonite, prepared aluminium oxide, "waterglass" (sodium silicate), herb extracts, herb liquid manure and teas (e.g. nettle, horsetail, onion, horse radish, parsley fern), ethyl alcohol, milk and whey products, sodium hydrogen carbonate. These products are not considered as plant protection, but fortifying agents, which can be used in accordance with the EU Regulation 2092/91 in Germany. The following products are excluded or restricted in their use according to the BIOLAND standard, but permitted in the EU Regulation.: bees wax (not considered as plant protection agent in Germany), gelatine, extraction from Nicotina tabacum, rotenon, diammoniumphosphate, metaldehyde, pyrethoids in traps, ethylene and potassium alum, copper preparations with further restrictions (max metallic copper amount 3 kg/ha and year, in hop cultivation max 4 kg/ha and year, in potato cultivation only with permission of the BIOLAND Association. If agents with copper content are used, the copper content of the soil must be continuously monitored by means of soil analysis). In order to avoid negative influences on products as well as on the environment (i.e. by the accumulation of copper in soil), substances considered to be critical and whose beneficial effects can also be caused by other products or methods are prohibited by the BIOLAND Association. Moreover some of the substances (ethylene, potassium alum) are not relevant for plant production in the area certified by BIOLAND.
Plant protection, substances, Azadirachtin (Neem), Quassia and Rotenone - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Azadirachtin (Neem), Quassia and Rotenone are not allowed for plant protection purposes in any organic and conventional plant cultures in Denmark. The DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2 "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark" does not mention Azacirachtin (Neem), Quassia and Rotenone. Azadirachtin (Neem), Quassia and Rotenone are not allowed as "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark", while products based on these substances may be used as insecticides (or mainly as repellent - Quassia), if need is recognised by the inspection authority according to Annex II B of the EU Regulation 2092/91. No plant protection products based on Azadirachtin (Neem), Quassia and Rotenone have been approved for use in Denmark by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, which is the public authority responsible for evaluation and approval of all pesticides to be used in Denmark. To be approved a full documentation for pesticide evaluation will be needed and no companies have applied for that. Rotenone e.g. is a broad insecticide and may be very harmful to aquatic organisms.
Plant protection, substances, hydrolysed proteins - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Hydrolysed proteins are not allowed as attractants in organic plant production in Denmark, because there are no products approved by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency undder the Danish Ministry for Environment. Hydrolysed proteins are not allowed according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark". According to Annex II B, Section I of the EU Regulation 2092/91 hydrolysed proteins are allowed as attractant in authorized applications in combination with other appropriate products of this Annex II, part B. Hydrolysed protein has not been approved for use as attractant in Denmark by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, which is the public authority responsible for evaluation and approval of all pesticides to be used in Denmark.
Plant protection, substances, mineral oils - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Mineral oils are not allowed for plant protection purposes in organic plant production in Denmark according to DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark" because there is an alternative, paraffin oil. Mineral oils are not allowed according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark". According to Annex II B, Section IV of the EU Regulation 2092/91 Mineral oils are allowed as fungicide and insecticide for use in fruit trees, vines, olive trees and tropical crops, when the need is recognised by the inspection body or inspection authority. Mineral oils are not approved for use as insecticide or fungicide in organic farming in Denmark, because there is an alternative, paraffin oil, which, according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Producion 2006 may be used against insects, spinning mites and mildew in fruit trees and bushes before bluming and after harvest plus in roses and other horticultural plants. Mineral oils contain toxic substances, which may harm beneficial organisms.
Plant protection, substances, pyrethrins - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Pyrethrins extracted from Chrysanthemum cinerarieaefolium are not available for plant protection purposes in organic plant production in Denmark, because there are no products approved by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency, which contain pyrethrin as the only active substance. Pyrethrins extracted from Chrysanthemum cinerarieaefolium are allowed according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark", when need is recognised by the Plant Directorate, but no approved products with only natural Pyrethrins are available in Denmark. According to Annex II B, Section I of the EU Regulation 2092/91 Pyrethrins extracted from Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium are allowed when the need is recognised by the inspection body or inspection authority. No plant protection products based on Pyrethrins from Chrysanthemum cineraiaefolium without the synthetic synergist, piperonylbutoxid have been approved for use in Denmark by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, which is the public authority responsible for evaluation and approval of all pesticides to be used in Denmark. The use of syntehtic pesticides or additives in organic crop production is against the principles of health, ecology and care
Plant protection, substances, traps/dispensers - DK Governmental Guidelines 2006 Diammonimum phosphate, Pheromones and Pyrethroids (only deltamethrin or lambda-cyhalothrin) are not approved for use in traps or dispensers for plant protection purposes in organic plant production in Denmark because Diammonium phosphate and pheromones for use in traps and dispensers have not been approved by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, and Batrocera oleae and Ceratitis capitata wied, which are the only insects Pyrethroids may be used against in organic farming, are not found in Denmark The substances to be used in traps and/or dispensers, Diammonimum phosphate, Pheromones and Pyrethroids (only deltamethrin or lambda-cyhalothrin) are not approved according to the DK Governmental Guidelines on Organic Agricultural Production 2006, Annex 2: "Active substances which under certain circumstances may be used as plant protection agents on organic or in-conversion areas in Denmark". According to the EU Regulation 2092/91, Annex II B, Section III, Diammonium phosphate and Pheromones are allowed without restrictions, while Pyrethroids are allowed only against Batrocera oleae and Ceratitis capitata. Diammonimum phosphate and Pheromones for use in traps and dispensers have not been approved by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency under the Danish Ministry for Environment, which is the public authority responsible for evaluation and approval of all pesticides to be used in Denmark, and Batrocera oleae and Ceratitis capitata wied are insects, which are not found in Denmark
Plant protection, substances, weed control - Int. IFOAM Standards 2005
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Noxious weeds should be controlled by a combination of soil management and crop rotation measures. Application of products that are prepared at the farm from local plants, animals and micro-organisms, are permitted for weed control when crop rotation measures are insufficient. (4.5.)
IFOAM indicated methods for the control of noxoius weeds in detail and admitted substances are indicated. EU Regulation 2092/91 lists the latter in the positive list of ANNEX II B, such as 'Microorganisms approved for pest control'. No restrictions concerning the target organism are listed, therefore under EU Regulation these organisms are applicable for the control of noxoius weeds. No justification could be provided